Do most Teens have a Smartphone? New Study says Yes

88% of teens have either their own or at least have access to a mobile phone of some kind. For 73% of teens, this mobile phone is a smartphone.

via Do most Teens have a Smartphone? New Study says Yes.

April Is Child Abuse Prevention Month

What is child abuse?

Child abuse is the physical maltreatment or sexual molestation of a child.

childabuse

Child abuse can also come in many other forms today.

Bullying and cyberbullying has opened a new emotional form of abuse that children are exposed to that can leave long-term scars that are not always physical.

As a parent, caregiver or anyone in a community, we should be aware of the signs of child abuse and learn about prevention and awareness.

To learn more visit the following sites:

The Childhelp Hotline – for abuse

Cyberbullying.us – for online abuse

Stopbullying.gov – for bullying

Take the time this month to become more alert and aware of how you could potentially help a child.

Gifts from the Enemy

Children's Books Heal

Gifts from the Enemy9781935952978_p0_v2_s260x420Gifts from the Enemy

Trudy Ludwig, Author

Craig Orback, Illustrator

White Cloud Press,  Biography, 2014

Suitable for Ages: 8-12

Themes: Alter Wiener, Poland, Jews, Holocaust, Survivor, Courage, Kindness

Opening: “There are those who say that what I’ve lived through never happened. But I’m here to tell you that it did. My name is Alter Wiener and I am an ordinary person with an extraordinary past.”

Synopsis: Alter Wiener was a 13-year-old boy living with his family in Chrzanow, a small town in southwest Poland. His home was filled with love, laughter, food and books. Every Friday they shared their Sabbath dinner with a student or homeless person. When the German Nazi soldiers invaded and occupied Poland in 1939, Hitler ordered his army to imprison and kill millions of Jews. Alter’s father and older brother were taken when he was 13. The Nazis came for him when he was 15. He was moved to…

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Connecting the Generation Gap: Students Making A Difference

A great way for students to make a difference!

Cyber-seniors are now experiencing a new world thanks to students taking time to teach them about the Internet.

Learn more.

Securing Our Schools: The Need For Safety In The Classroom

250 years of Violence in our schools: a tragic timeline

Securing Schools
Source:

Security Degree Hub

1764: Enoch Brown school shooting massacre: four Lenape American Indian entered the schoolhouse near Greencastle, Pennsylvania, shot and killed schoolmaster Enoch Brown, and nine or ten children

April 9, 1891: The first known mass shooting in the U.S. where students were shot, when 70 year old James Foster fired a shotgun at a group of students in the playground of St. Mary’s Parochial School, Newburgh, New York

August 1966: Charles Whitman opened fire from the clock tower at the University of Texas at Austin, killing 16 people and wounding 31.

April 20, 1999 Littleton, Colorado: 14 students (including shooters) and one teacher killed, 27 others wounded at Columbine High School in the nation’s deadliest school shooting. Eric Harris, 18, and Dylan Klebold, 17, had plotted for a year to kill at least 500 and blow up their school.

March 24, 1998, Jonesboro, Ark.: Four students and one teacher killed, ten others wounded outside as Westside Middle School emptied during a false fire alarm.

Oct. 3, 2006, Nickel Mines, Pa.: 32-year-old Carl Charles Roberts IV entered the one-room West Nickel Mines Amish School and shot 10 schoolgirls, and then himself.

April 16, 2007, Blacksburg, Va.: A 23-year-old Virginia Tech student, Cho Seung-Hui, killed two in a dorm, then killed 30 more 2 hours later in a classroom building. His suicide brought the death toll to 33, making the shooting rampage the most deadly in U.S. history.

Dec. 14, 2012, Newton, Connecticut: Twenty-six people — 20 students and six adults — were shot and killed at the Sandy Hook Elementary School by 20 year old Adam Lanza.
QUOTE: “This was like our 9/11 for school teachers.” – said by a teacher in Florida to the Associated Press

The cold, hard facts:

Since 1980, 297 people have been killed in school shootings.

Elementary schools saw the fewest shootings (17), while high schools saw the most (62)

Lessons learned, steps taken:

After the Columbine shootings:
Some schools across the country turned themselves into near-fortresses

Kindergarden students huddled beneath desks in a lockdown drill. Such drills have become common.

Some schools installed metal detectors and security cameras, banned backpacks, required students to carry IDs and posted police in the hallways — all in the name of keeping students safe.

In time, experts realized the first and best line of defense is always a well-trained, highly alert staff and student body.

The No. 1 way we find out about weapons in schools is not from a piece of equipment but from a kid who comes forward and reports it to an adult that he or she trusts

FACT: Allocations for the Department of Education’s Safe and Drug-Free Schools program were cut by a third between 1999 and 2008, to about $294.8 million. And a program that has put about 6,300 police officers in public schools since Columbine was scrapped by the U.S. Department of Justice after 2005.

FACT: A 2008 Secret Service report found that in more than 80 percent of instances of school violence, at least one person, usually a fellow student or peer, had knowledge of the attackers’ plans.

After the Virginia Tech massacre
38 states banned students from carrying or using weapons in schools – 16 of which have specifically banned guns from any part of a college campus.

EBay stopped allowing the sale of firearm parts and ammunition on the popular site after it was learned that the shooter had purchased 10-round magazines for his gun on the site.

Schools in the US as well as abroad made changes to their own school safety politicies and procedures in the aftermath of the Virginia Tech shootings.

Changes to then Federal Gun Laws were made and loopholes that allowed the shooter, who was deemed mentally unstable, to purchase a gun were closed. Now someone with a known history of mental illness like Seung-Hui Cho are not allowed to purchase guns or ammunition.

After the Sandy Hook Elementary massacre:
Some districts have trained teachers and school staff to carry guns in case of a school shooter.

Uniformed police are being hired to patrol the halls in some districts

Since January, 2013, about 4,500 people across the country have been trained in mental health first aid for children.

Schools need counselors, psychologists and officers building relationships with kids, because they are the best line of defense.

Districts are looking at how to harden the infrastructure of their schools.

Besides shoring up windows, schools around the country were busy over the summer doing things like installing new locks on classroom doors.
Administrators realized every school should have crisis teams that review their plans regularly; every school would be wise to re-evaluate its security measures.
Infrastructure changes: Some schools are building single, prominent entryways, and reduced landscaping that once provided a place to hide. Restrooms are being shifted away from entryways and moved. Simpler keyless entry systems on doors make it less tempting to prop them open. Elaborate announcement systems that let police address a shooter without speaking to every classroom are being installed.

Some schools (with money) have invested in a high-tech system called Security Alert for Education (SAFE). Here, teachers wear a pendant that amplifies their voice during lectures — but also has a panic button button that allows them to immediately alert 911 during an emergency. Cameras mounted in classrooms are integrated into the system
The NRA suggests having armed police officers in the halls

Experts say: Major components and tasks for creating a safe school climate include:

Assessment of the school’s emotional climate;
Emphasis on the importance of listening in schools;
Adoption of a strong, but caring stance against the code of silence;
Prevention of, and intervention in, bullying, cyber-bullying;
Involvement of all members of the school community in planning, creating, and sustaining a school culture of safety and respect;
Development of trusting relationships between each student and at least one adult at school;
Creation of mechanisms for developing and sustaining safe school climates;
Schools need systems for identifying violent children and proactively intervening in their lives;
Recognizing that sometimes, adolescent mood swings and behavior changes might not be due to hormones or stress, but to substance abuse.

LAST DAY FOR APP ENTRIES: Crowdsourcing to Hack Autism: App Ideas from the Community, for the Community

AutismAppToday, one in 88 children is on the autism spectrum, according to a Centers for Disease Control study, and health officials have noted the prevalence is increasing.

As part of our commitment to innovation and an open network, AT&T has teamed up with Autism Speaks to host a “Hacking Autism” app contest to develop the most empowering and helpful app ideas from the autism community, and bring those ideas to third party developers.

All entrees must be submitted by Feb. 3. Finalists will be announced on Feb. 11. The authors of the top three app ideas in each category will receive a Pantech Element tablet. And the winning app ideas will form the basis of an upcoming AT&T Hackathon, where programmers will learn about developing for people on the autism spectrum and compete to bring the app ideas to life.

For more information on how to enter the contest, visit https://www.facebook.com/autismspeaks?v=app_306225262780703&rest=1

For additional details about the contest and how it came about, visit http://attinnovationspace.com/innovation/story/a7787166.

AutismApp2***************************************************************

Crowdsourcing to Hack Autism: App Ideas from the Community, for the Community

At least once a day I think to myself “what would I do without my smartphone?” No question — mobile technology has made our daily lives a little easier.

That sentiment is even greater in the autism community. Educators, parents and researchers have seen the benefits of touch screen tablets, mobile devices and apps to help individuals on the autism spectrum organize, learn and connect. This is particularly important because today, one in 88 children is on the autism spectrum, according to a Centers for Disease Control study, and health officials have noted the prevalence is increasing.

As part of our commitment to innovation and an open network, we’ve teamed up with Autism Speaks to crowdsource the most empowering and helpful app ideas from the autism community, and bring those ideas to third party developers. To that end, we’re hosting an app idea contest on the Autism Speaks Facebook page.  We’re asking for idea submissions in four categories: apps for those on the autism spectrum who are verbal, non-verbal, school-aged (K-12) and adults.

If you have a personal connection to autism and have an app that you would like to see made, enter by Feb. 3. Then, on Feb. 11, we’ll announce the finalists and the community will select the winners by voting for their favorite ideas. The authors of the top three app ideas in each category receive a Pantech Element tablet. And the winning app ideas will form the basis of an upcoming hackathon, where programmers will learn about developing for people on the autism spectrum, and compete to bring the app ideas to life.

At AT&T, we’re dedicated to fostering these important connections that spark innovation, teach us all things that we didn’t know before, and create new technologies to make our lives just a little easier.