Praying for a Miracle…. Danielle Herb: A Teen That Helped Many Children with ADD/ADHD/Autism Now Medically Needs Our Help

Please support Danielle Herb....

Teens that inspire….

Danielle Herb was always on the top of the list in Florida.

Today, however, she and her family are praying for a miracle and hoping you will read this and take a few minutes to watch the video click here.

Danielle Herb, her young age of 15 set out to change the lives of ADD/ADHD and autistic children through horses.  Her goal was to improve the lives of a million children.  She was well on her way with her equine therapy program called Drop Your Reins.

Horses are amazing because they are sentient animals that mirror our personalities as well as our fears. -Danielle Herb

Since being diagnosed with RSD/CRPS in June, 2010 and as her issues continue to present themselves she has since been diagnosed with POTS-Postural OrthostaticTachycardia Syndrome, Dysautonomia, Gastroparesis and Mitochondria Disease, Danielle Herb has been suffering in pain that has literally crippled her.

Through this pain she continues to want people to think about others.  She worries about the children that need her, the kids that depended upon her Drop Your Reins program that inspired so many children.

Danielle Herb’s mother, Marianne St. Clair, recently updated her daughter’s many friends and fans on the progress as well as the continued need for support.  Click here. Needless to say the financial burden has been overwhelming.

Danielle Herb before the disease took over...

Please take a few minutes to watch the video.  Anything you can donate is welcome, and all they prayers and support are appreciated.  Leave your words of support on this special page created for well-wishes.  Team-Danielle.

Teens that inspire…. Danielle Herb still tops the list!

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Sue Scheff: McKay Scholarship – Does Your Child Qualify?

Usually at this time of the year and progress reports are coming out for the first half of the second semester. Parents are reviewing their child’s academic progress and if their school is meeting their needs.

In Florida, the McKay Scholarship is offered to students that may have some difficulties academically where they are attending. 

What is the McKay Scholarship?

The John M. McKay Scholarship Program allows parents of students with disabilities to choose the best learning environment for their children.

The parent of a Florida public school student who is dissatisfied with the student’s progress may request a McKay Scholarship to enroll in and attend a private school or choose another public school that better suits the student’s needs.

Eligible students with disabilities may:

  • Remain at their assigned school
  • Attend another public school
  • Attend a public school in an adjacent district, or
  • Attend a participating private school.

 

If you would like to apply to the McKay Scholarship, the time is now for 2010.  Begin filing intent here.

To find out more about the McKay Scholarship, click here.

Read more on Examiner.

Sue Scheff: ADHD Family Summit 2009

edge_logoIt’s not too late to sign up for the 2009 ADHD Family Summit. And now is a good time to do it because this Wednesday, June 17, at 9:00 p.m. Eastern (8:00 Central, 7:00 Mountain, and 6:00 Pacific) Edge Foundation Executive Director, Sarah Wright, will be talking about how coaching can help your ADHD teen be successful in school, at home and in life. Did we mention that it’s FREE?
The ADHD Family Summit is organized by Rory Stern, a passionate advocate in the ADHD community. The teleseminars will be held throughout June on Monday and Wednesday evenings at 9:00 pm Eastern, and include access to a 24-hour replay line for people who aren’t able to listen in live.
Learn more: click here.

Sue Scheff: Parenting Tips for ADHD Kids and Teens

ADHD Parenting Tips: Be Positive and Calm
What does my style of parenting look like? Let’s say your nine-year-old refuses to comply with a simple request, like “Please pick up your toys.” Don’t repeat your request. Don’t yell or threaten a time-out. Instead, respond with action — firm, calm, quiet, and dramatic.
For instance, you might begin placing the toys into a container. If the child asks what you’re doing, you can say that the toys will remain in your possession until she pays you a small sum or performs certain chores. Your floor will be free of clutter — and your child will be more likely to comply next time.

SUE SCHEFF – ADHD Awareness Week

This is a great website and informational resource for parents with ADD/ADHD students – being an educated parent helps you to help your child!  As a parent with an ADHD child, I have learned so much here. 

 

Happy ADHD Awareness Week!

 

As you know, this week is all about spreading attention-deficit truth and support. So, to that end, ADDitude has created a new ADHD Information Center that we hope people will use all year to…

  • Dispel common myths about ADHD
  • Fight ADHD stigmas
  • Explain the facts about ADHD
  • Find support from other ADHD adults and parents
  • Revel in all the great things about ADHD

We hope you will share our ADHD Information Center with your readers during this ADHD Awareness Week, and also pass along the following personal diary entry from author, ADHD spokesman and ADDitude contributor Jonathan Mooney:

 

“Cheers, fellow ADDers! Be proud of the gifts ADD affords you: a gusto for life, a capacity to dream large, the ability to set goals — and the energy to meet them. In being comfortable with yourself, you can change how the world perceives ADD and recognizes its strengths.

This September, recount your successes and what makes you stand out from the crowd—like the time you put your mind to it and ran an eight-minute-mile marathon or completed the Sunday crossword puzzle before your second cup of coffee.

Have a sense of humor about your ADD: Toast yourself at dinner for not having misplaced your keys in the morning or for having remembered to take your debit card out of the ATM. Let yourself—and others—laugh to take the pressure off of being perfect.

By celebrating your small feats, you will be able to tackle bigger challenges. Even a simple change in language can transform your self-esteem and others’ perception of your accomplishments. Use “and” more than “but.”

For example, I could say, “I finished this article, but it was three weeks late.” That statement discounts my accomplishment, as if the final product were flawed. I prefer, “I finished this article, and it was three weeks late.” The second statement is equally true, and it doesn’t diminish all of the work I put into it. Next time, I can say, “I will be on time!”

Use this month—this year, every year—to share your pride over the gifts you have. The world’s appreciation of ADD depends on your feeling good about yourself, so tell your friends, family—even the bagger at your local grocery store—all about your condition, especially if they know little about it.”

To read the remainder of this article, “Smile – It’s ADHD Awareness Month!” visit http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/4000.html

Best,

 

www.ADDitudeMag.com

(Sue Scheff) Michael Phelp’s Mom on How to Raise an ADHD Superstar

As a mother of an ADHD son, I am constantly reminding others that being ADD/ADHD is not a handicap – these kids are highly intelligent!  Being a parent we will do what is best for our children, whether it is medication (which to some is controversial) or using specific diets such as the Feingold Program.  Either way, we as parents have to find what works best for our families and child.

Source: ADDitude Magazine

Meet the mothers of three ADHD super-achievers — an Olympic record-breaker, a TV heavyweight, and a world-class adventurer — and learn how they helped their kids beat the odds.

What does it take to succeed despite attention deficit disorder (ADD ADHD)? It takes hard work, for starters — a willingness to meet challenges head-on. It takes support from family members, teachers, therapists, and coaches. And, of course, it’s hard to overstate the benefits of ADHD medication.

But, of all the ingredients needed to make a happy, successful life, nothing is more important than good parenting. Behind almost every ADHD success story is a devoted parent (or two). In honor of mothers, let’s give credit where credit is due.

The three mothers profiled here helped their sons and daughters achieve great things — more than they could have imagined. Steadfast and resourceful, they saw strength where others saw weakness, and kept looking for ways to help their children after others were ready to give up. Let their stories inspire you!

Read entire article here: http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/1998.html

(Sue Scheff) Can The Feingold Program Help Your ADD/ADHD Child?

For years we have struggled with ADD/ADHD children and the issues that surround mediciation and the affects it has on the kids.  As a parent of an ADHD son, after extensive testing, he was diagnosed ADHD in Kindergarten.  Through the years, we tried a variety of medications however always came back to the one that worked best for him.  I don’t believe he was over-medicated and neither does he.  By freshman year in college, he was medication free.

I was made aware of The Feingold Diet when my son was younger, but as a single mother of two children, it didn’t fit our schedule or my busy routine.  Some people may view this as an excuse, but for me, it wasn’t an option I could accomodate.  But – that doesn’t mean it isn’t a viable alternative to medications.

Over the years, I have heard from many parents of the success of The Feingold Program as well as recently reviewed “Why My Child Can’t Behave” by Jane Hersey. Understanding how this program works can help parents understand the negative behavior of ADD/ADHD and what triggers it. 

If you have a child that has behavioral issues or has been diagnosed ADD/ADHD please take the time to learn more about The Newly Updated Feingold Program that is designed to accomodate the busy lives of families today.

Read this wonderful testimonial from Joshua – I think this sheds light on what the right diet can do for you and your family.

www.findingjoshua.org

My son, Joshua, was plagued with social and behavioral problems. He was asked to leave two private schools, rejected from several local day care facilities, and finally placed in a program for “severely emotionally handicapped” children and put on medication for ADHD – all before the age of five!

He was in a class of six children and three teachers to deal with the behavioral challenges these children presented. Throughout the years my son was diagnosed with severe ADHD and ODD (oppositional defiant disorder), along with traits of obsessive compulsive disorder, Tourette’s syndrome, and mood disorder syndrome. These years proved to be more difficult than I could have ever imagined.

 

Even before they’re born, parents have so many hopes and desires for their children. I felt as though my dreams had turned to nightmares and it seemed like I’d never wake up.

Even though testing indicated that Joshua was extremely gifted, his emotional and behavioral problems kept him labeled as emotionally handicapped.

During the next seven years he was on three medications, totaling nine pills a day. It seemed necessary to keep him medicated 24 hours a day, every day. Symptoms that were treated with one medicine caused him to have trouble sleeping, so he had to take an additional medication for that, and yet another for the endless anxiety resulting from the issues he faced daily with social and behavioral problems. He had huge problems with opposition, defiance, aggression, anger, and impulsivity. The doctors tried different dosages and combinations of the medicines but without success.

He was kept medicated 24 hours a day and the problems only got worse.

Toward the end of his fourth grade year, Joshua was placed in an outpatient facility for depression, leaning towards suicidal. Children typically attended this facility for a week at the most, just enough time to be evaluated, receive recommendations for therapy, medication, behavior modification and family counseling. However, Joshua’s behavior was such that he continued for five weeks.

None of the many professionals we saw were able to help him.

Time passed and problems remained despite medication and continual counseling. Two other medicines were recommended, in addition to the three he was on, but I couldn’t bring myself to give my ten-year-old 5 different drugs. Towards the end of his fifth grade year he was placed in a children’s psychiatric facility after he threatened to kill others and tried to hurt himself. Joshua had reached the end of his rope.

I was told that I could not see him or call him for the first 24 hours he was at the facility. As I said “good-bye” there was so much hurt behind his beautiful blue eyes, so much uncertainty of “Where do I fit in, why am I like this? When will my life be normal, and when will I feel at peace inside?”

The immense pain I felt for my child left me numb and hopeless. I wanted so badly to take him in my arms, hug him and tell him that everything would be okay, but I didn’t know that to be so. I would go to the ends of the earth for him but felt as though I was already there and didn’t know where to go from here. Despite all the avenues I took, all the endless hours of searching, every year continued to grow darker and darker.

The immense pain for my child left me numb and hopeless.

After several days Joshua was released from the hospital. Since the medicines were not helping, his doctor recommended we remove them all and start on a different regimen. For the remaining weeks of school he was in a homebound program where the teacher came to our home.

The doctor assured me that by weaning Joshua off the medicines slowly there would be no problems with withdrawal. The opposite was true! We went through three weeks of severely out-of-control behavior. Several times Joshua became extremely violent and I came close to calling 911 for help.

His reaction to withdrawal from the many drugs was a nightmare.

Next, I tried allergy treatments at a clinic and they helped somewhat. Still searching, I learned of the Feingold Program and that’s when my son’s recovery began in earnest.[www.feingold.org / (800) 321-3287]

Joshua has a severe behavioral reaction to certain synthetic food additives.

Joshua had traveled down a difficult road filled with hurt, disappointment and fear for as long as he can remember. He lost much of his childhood to this journey, but because of Feingold, Joshua has a new beginning.

Now, at age 17, we are starting our seventh consecutive year that Joshua does not carry the label “emotionally handicapped.” Looking back, our success began when Joshua was in the sixth grade. It was roughly 8 weeks prior to school starting that we began the Feingold diet. Six weeks into the diet we saw dramatic changes in Joshua. Seventh grade went so well that during the annual meeting required for all students that receive “special services,” the school suggested a battery of behavioral testing and classroom observations to determine if Joshua still needed the services and the label that he carried in his file. After thorough testing and review, Joshua’s eight-year special needs folder was permanently closed. He no longer exhibited any signs of needing help in any form. This was truly a victory!

This is the seventh consecutive year Joshua’s teachers have told me he shows respect and cooperation without any opposition. Joshua is finally able to manage his anger when things don’t go his way (this feat alone was like a mountain to conquer).

Joshua no longer has trouble controlling his behavior. He is thriving in school and in all areas of his life.

His teachers view him as pleasant to be around as well as a good student. Joshua is able to remain seated for an extended period, is capable of thinking before acting, and no longer needs behavioral therapy. I no longer receive calls to come pick him up at school because he’s out of control and disruptive. Joshua has been able to attend events through the school or sports where I was not required to stay “just in case there’s a problem.”

 

Joshua went a total of seven years being medicated 24 hours a day with three medications (totaling 9 pills a day, for 365 days a year) to a healthy diet and absolutely no medicine.

 

Joshua is finally forming strong friendships. This list could go on but the bottom line is …since Feingold, this is the first time I like my son, and best of all HE likes who he’s become.

Our life finally feels, and is, “normal.” This is what we have both hoped for.

I know my son’s “transformation” did not occur due to maturity, changing schools, peer pressure, a reward system, or anything of the sort. The changes in Joshua came as a result of the simple changes we made in the food we eat.

A few months after we began seeing success on Feingold, Joshua wanted to do what he called “an experiment.” I allowed him to eat the synthetic chemicals (foods containing artificial colors and flavors) for a week because I knew his cooperation was essential for this to work. On the fourth day he began having rage attacks, showing opposition and defiance, just like before. He shouted at his teacher, threw a book across the room at another student, and spent a day in the principal’s office.

When he went back to eating the synthetic chemicals, the old behaviors returned in four days. It was a humiliating experience for my son.

He embarrassed himself terribly in front of his peers and came home asking to ditch the experiment. This validated the fact that the diet was truly the key to his happiness and success.

For the entire story – visit www.findingjoshua.org