Cell Phones and Driving: Should There be a Ban?

The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) issued a new recommendation urging all 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia to enact laws banning all cell phone use while driving, with no exception for hands-free use.

Given modern American society’s twin love affairs with motor vehicles and mobile phones, this recommendation could have massive ramifications for individuals, employers and government organizations. But the laws the NTSB is calling for are difficult and expensive to enforce, as these studies show:

  • A 2010 IIHS study found that state texting bans don’t work to reduce driver cell phone use and may even *increase* crashes
  • Pilot programs testing specialized, highly visibile enforcement demonstrate why effective enforcement requires more time, money and manpower than most police departments can afford
  • NHTSA’s landmark survey on distracted driving attitudes revealed that plenty (25%) of drivers don’t even believe texting negatively affects their own driving performance

Laws alone don’t work to change driver behavior. This is where technology becomes part of the solution – not just part of the problem.

The NTSB itself has recognized the need for innovative enforcement solutions, including safe driving technology like FleetSafer Vision and FleetSafer Mobile.

These software services offer employers a simple and affordable way to promote safe and legal use of cell phones by employee drivers.

Take advantage of a free demo today to see for yourself how FleetSafer™ solutions work to prevent distracted driving.

Source:  Zoom Safer

Especially young drivers today, teens that are so attached to their cell phones and texting, need to learn the importance of unplugging, turning off and detaching while driving.  Texting, talking and driving can kill.  Never forget it.

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